Thursday, 17 August 2017

The road is a strange country - Rebecca Solnit

'In motion it seems that time is not slipping away from us but we are pursuing it, measuring its passage in the rhythm of the road... Perhaps if we didn’t imagine life as a journey rather than some other metamorphosis—the growth of a tree, for example—roads would not seem like destiny itself, but we do and they do. To move along the road is to encounter all the loose elements, the dangers and possibilities, to slip out of a settled destiny in pursuit of stranger fates. The road is a promise as simple as what lies ahead, never failed and never delivered, and the road is a strange country itself, longer than all the continents and narrow as a house, with its own citizens, its own rules, a place where the solid and settled become fluid'.

 'Roads are a no-man’s-land, a leveling ground, the place where one is no longer one thing and not yet another'

'Being in motion wakes the body up. In repose one is nothing but a surface face of potential sensation, only the surface, the skin, is awake. Exertion and pain make the rest tangible— otherwise bones and muscles and organs would be little but articles of faith beneath the visible and sensible surface of skin, and so one’s own interior anatomy may be among the things explored in the course of a journey’s exertions'



(Rebecca Solnit, A Book of Migrations, 1997 -  reflections on her travels across Ireland, including some timely thoughts on dubious notions of blood, soil and identity, and on the joys and otherwise of journeying. No running in the book, but lots of walking, and I thought her notion of the road as another country is something felt by runners, as is the experience  of getting to know our anatomy through motion and pain)

Sunday, 13 August 2017

Yoga for People Who Can't be Bothered to Do it

I've done a couple of yoga sessions this year, prompted by the fact that while I have a kind of elevated running mono-fitness I can sometimes barely move my body through any other range of motions. But the allure of flexibility has not been enough to keep me engaged and I feel very much like Geoff Dyer in his witty travelogue  'Yoga for People who Can't be Bothered to Do it' (2003). 

Recalling a stay at a sanctuary resort in Thailand, Dyer writes:

'I didn't even do yoga. I was practically the only person who didn't. A lot of people did yoga even when they weren't actually doing it. They were always stretching or bending or just sitting in quite demanding positions. Everyone had perfect posture and walked as though gravity were an option rather than a law. I wished I 'd been doing yoga for years - but I was incapable of starting...


'Kate had heard 'I was some kind of writer' and wondered what kind of things I wrote.


'I have an idea for a self help book' I said. 'Yoga for People Who Can't be Bothered to Do it'


'But you can't be bothered to write it, right?'


'You stole my punch line,' I said.


(I have seen this filed in a bookshop under heath and fitness, but it is definitely not any kind of manual!)

Tuesday, 1 August 2017

Jodie Whittaker - from London Marathon to Dr Who





There's been a fair amount of nonsense over the last few weeks since it was announced that the next incarnation of Dr Who will be a woman, played by Jodie Whittaker. Not sure what the fuss is about,  if there can be a female Doctor of Medicine or Philosophy why on earth shouldn't there be a female Doctor of Time Travel in a somewhat rickety old children's science fiction series  in need of a new lick of paint - after 12 men have had a go. More to the point Jodie Whittaker does actually have a real superpower - she can run.


The power has been briefly glimpsed in Broadchurch, where she played the character of Beth over three series. In the most recent series her ex-husband tried to interrupt her seafront session with a deep conversation but she wasn't having it...






In real life, as Running is Funny reported a few years ago, Jodie ran 'the Robin Hood Half Marathon in 2004 and 2005, completing it in 2:23 and 2:13, respectively, then moved up in distance. She completed the 2007 New York City Marathon in 4:38', and ran the London Marathon in 2012 for Mencap, a British learning disability charity, finishing in 4:45:41.


Jodie Whittaker in 2012 London Marathon - running with Team Harry written on her arms. Jodie's nephew, Harry Whittaker, who had Downs Syndrome, died in 2014. He was an actor too, and appeared in Emmerdale.